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writing:introduction_-_plan 2008/03/07 01:02 writing:introduction_-_plan 2008/04/16 19:32 current
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-  * Plan - 2 pages of bullet-points, with 3-5 headings, plus 3-5 bullet-points per section, including major citations +Note: This content has been updated [[http://ucspace.canberra.edu.au/display/~s613374/Research+supervision+-+Introduction|here]].  
-  * Draft should include title, table of contents (for the chapter), and references +  
-  * May include specific comments or questions students want to address to supervisor +  * Plan - 2 pages of bullet-points, with 3-5 headings, plus 3-5 bullet-points per section, including major citations  
-  * An "Introduction Plan" is a ~2 page document which outlines (in bullet-point format) the planned structure and content for your Introduction. +  * Draft should include title, table of contents (for the chapter), and references  
-  * The full Introduction to a 4th year thesis should be approximately 3,000 - 4,000 words - roughly the length of a reasonably indepth, but nevertheless succint, literature review essay.  It identifies a particular research question, establishes its importance, and reviews and critiques available theory and research pertaining to the research question.  Finally, the introduction proposes several specific hypotheses, the rationale for which derives logically from the literature review. +  * May include specific comments or questions students want to address to supervisor  
-  * To create a plan, you might have a brainstorm about potentially relevant material (caste the net wide initially), and then sort through, merge, discard, and prioritize these ideas.  Also consider how they might be organised in a logical sequence, and try to whittle down so they are only including what is critical or essential for addressing the research question and providing relevant background to each of the the hypotheses. +  * An "Introduction Plan" is a ~2 page document which outlines (in bullet-point format) the planned structure and content for your Introduction.  
-  * For your plan, I suggest having several sub-headings, which are also used in the full draft: +  * The full Introduction to a 4th year thesis should be approximately 3,000 - 4,000 words - roughly the length of a reasonably indepth, but nevertheless succint, literature review essay.  It identifies a particular research question, establishes its importance, and reviews and critiques available theory and research pertaining to the research question.  Finally, the introduction proposes several specific hypotheses, the rationale for which derives logically from the literature review.  
-    * [Introduction] - according to APA format, this is left untitled - its a general introduction of approx. 300 - 500 words which should introduce the topic, its importance, establish the research question, and briefly define/outline key terms and issues. +  * To create a plan, you might have a brainstorm about potentially relevant material (caste the net wide initially), and then sort through, merge, discard, and prioritize these ideas.  Also consider how they might be organised in a logical sequence, and try to whittle down so they are only including what is critical or essential for addressing the research question and providing relevant background to each of the the hypotheses.  
-    * Topic 1 +  * For your plan, I suggest having several sub-headings, which are also used in the full draft:  
-    * Topic 2 +    * [Introduction] - according to APA format, this is left untitled - its a general introduction of approx. 300 - 500 words which should introduce the topic, its importance, establish the research question, and briefly define/outline key terms and issues.  
-    * Topic 3 +    * Topic 1  
-    * Summary +    * Topic 2  
-    * Hypotheses - I prefer to number these, it helps to keep track of them through the Results and Discussion +    * Topic 3  
-  * For the Introduction Plan, use these headings followed by several bullet-points and possibly sub-bullet-points about the main content you intend to discuss.  Cite your major references (and attach your reference list when sending to me). +    * Summary  
-  * You may also indicate in the bullet-points whether you're unsure or have questions about what to include. +    * Hypotheses - I prefer to number these, it helps to keep track of them through the Results and Discussion  
-  * It can be helpful to model your introduction on a favourite article (or thesis) - have a close look at the  structure of its introduction. +  * For the Introduction Plan, use these headings followed by several bullet-points and possibly sub-bullet-points about the main content you intend to discuss.  Cite your major references (and attach your reference list when sending to me).  
-  * It can also be helpful to visualise the 'hour-glass' model, whereby the Introduction forms the top half (the funnelling), starting broad and narrowing.  The Discussion does the opposite - goes from narrow to broad.  It should be possible to read smoothly from the end of the Introduction into the Discussion (missing the Method and Results). +  * You may also indicate in the bullet-points whether you're unsure or have questions about what to include.  
-  * This is a good time to get hold of key articles and book, and to make inter-library loan orders for anything you can't readily access. +  * It can be helpful to model your introduction on a favourite article (or thesis) - have a close look at the  structure of its introduction.  
-  * Word-count: Allocate an estimated word count for each of your major headings - this will help to ensure you have a balanced plan which will fit into the overall word count; it also helps with "chunking" the drafting process into smaller sections.+  * It can also be helpful to visualise the 'hour-glass' model, whereby the Introduction forms the top half (the funnelling), starting broad and narrowing.  The Discussion does the opposite - goes from narrow to broad.  It should be possible to read smoothly from the end of the Introduction into the Discussion (missing the Method and Results).  
 +  * This is a good time to get hold of key articles and book, and to make inter-library loan orders for anything you can't readily access.  
 +  * Word-count: Allocate an estimated word count for each of your major headings - this will help to ensure you have a balanced plan which will fit into the overall word count; it also helps with "chunking" the drafting process into smaller sections.
  * Submit your Introduction Plan (approx. 2 pages + references) to your supervisor and possibly your peers for feedback and discussion - and arrange a meeting to discuss.   * Submit your Introduction Plan (approx. 2 pages + references) to your supervisor and possibly your peers for feedback and discussion - and arrange a meeting to discuss.
 
writing/introduction_-_plan.txt · Last modified: 2008/04/16 19:32 by jtneill
 
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